SnoreLab’s Recommended Snoring Remedies

SnoreLab aims to give you the data to help you find the best solution for your snoring. Everyone is unique so there is no one-size-fits-all snoring remedy.

There are multiple techniques and consumer remedies that can be used to reduce snoring. Here is a guide to the popular solutions we list in SnoreLab …


What is it?

Mouthpieces are amongst the most popular and effective snoring remedies. They are usually made from medical-grade plastic and fit in your mouth while you sleep.

How does it work?

Mouthpieces, sometimes called MADs (mandibular advancement devices) bring the lower jaw forward to tighten the soft tissue in the airway that is prone to vibration. They also limit mouth breathing during sleep, promoting healthier, quieter nasal breathing.

Who is it for?

Around two-thirds of snorers can benefit from an anti-snoring mouthpiece and can even be a more effective treatment than CPAP for mild-moderate sleep apnea. They can be particularly helpful for:

  • People whose snoring has worsened with age
  • Overweight snorers
  • Back-sleepers
  • Mild-moderate obstructive sleep apnea sufferers
  • After drinking alcohol
  • Open-mouthed sleepers
  • Snorers with an overbite.

Which one is right for me?

There are many different types of MAD available so finding the right one can be a bit confusing.

When buying a generic mouthpiece online (i.e. not one custom-made by a dentist), we recommend adjustable mouthpieces or ones that come in different sizes; this will allow you to ease yourself into using the device and is less likely to cause discomfort.

Read SnoreLab’s full guide to anti-snoring mouthpieces

What is it?

Many snorers are tongue-base snorers. This is where the base of your tongue falls back into your airway and disrupts airflow.

Tongue retainers or tongue stabilising devices suck onto the end of your tongue to keep it from causing airway obstruction.

How does it work?

By squeezing the tip of the mouthpiece, you create a vacuum that pulls your tongue forward. The outer edges of the device rest in front of your teeth and gums, keeping everything in place. Once fitted correctly, your tongue will sit in between your teeth, crucially, away from the back of your throat.

Why is it good?

If you are indeed a tongue snorer, there are several advantages of a tongue retainer over a generic anti-snoring mouthpiece:

  • Universal fit. Tongue retainers don’t require and adjustment, you can wear it straight away.
  • Comfortable. The nature of a tongue retainer combined with soft, flexible materials mean no lower jaw pain and greater comfort.
  • Can be worn with dentures. Unlike mouthpieces, tongue retainers don’t fit over teeth so can be used by people with dentures.

Who is it for?

Many different types of snorer can benefit from the use of a tongue retainer:

  • Overweight people. Excess fat around the neck can lead to compression of the throat which can bring on snoring. Holding your tongue forward can mitigate this, opening your airways and reducing snoring.
  • Open-mouthed sleepers. If you wake up with a dry mouth or sore throat, it’s because you have been mouth-breathing in your sleep. This is known to aggravate snoring. Tongue retainers not only eep your tongue away from your airway but also promote quieter, healthier nasal breathing.
  • Mild-moderate sleep apnea sufferers. Tongue retainers have shown to be effective for people who suffer from mild-moderate sleep apnea and can therefore be an alternative remedy for those who don’t tolerate CPAP.

Discover SnoreLab’s recommended tongue retainer, the Good Morning Snore Solution

What is it?

Foam wedge pillows are specialist pillows that promote a raised sleeping position.

Who is it for?

Foam wedge pillows are ideal if your snoring is worse when you sleep on your back. They can also help with other conditions such as acid reflux (which is also implicated in some snoring cases).

How does it work?

Back sleepers are more at risk of snoring. This is due to the weight of the tissue around the airway acting to compress it and the increased likelihood of also sleeping with an open mouth.

Studies have found that even slightly elevating your head can have dramatic effects on both snoring and sleep apnea, with patients showing an average 32% reduction in their AHI score.

Raising your head slightly with a wedge pillow has shown to have dramatic benefits for many SnoreLab users.

“When I first started using SnoreLab, my Snore Score was anywhere between 50 and 96. I started to try some of the different remedies. So I bought a wedge pillow and in one night my Snore Score went down to near zero and has stayed near zero ever since using the pillow. I had seen three doctors, two specialists, one dentist and had a sleep study conducted – they all pointed me to dental appliances which I had trouble wearing. No one had suggested a wedge pillow. Thank you SnoreLab!”

Shop for SnoreLab’s recommended foam wedge pillow

What is it?

Mouth taping uses special adhesive to close your mouth at night and promote nasal breathing. It is best done with specialist, medical-grade hypoallergenic tape.

How does it work?

This simple, cheap and non-invasive remedy discourages noisy, unhealthy mouth breathing by gently holding your lips together, forcing you to breathe through your nose.

“They reduced my snoring significantly. My wife is very happy. On the first night I used them, she was worried that I was so quiet during the night!”

Breathing through your mouth is one of the most common causes of snoring; it compresses your throat, forces your tongue further back into your airway which reduces space and increases resistance.

Why is it beneficial?

As well showing great results for stopping snoring, encouraging nasal breathing with mouth tape also has other health benefits; giving you better sleep and reducing the chance of infection and allergies.

Read more about SnoreLab’s recommended mouth tape – SomniFix mouth strips

What are they?

Nasal strips look and behave like a plaster. They have a gentle adhesive that sticks to the outside of your nose just above the nostrils.

These simple devices open up your nasal passageways by sticking to the external surface of your nose (unlike internal nasal dilators which are inserted into the nostrils).

How do they work?

The parallel bands of rigid plastic use a springboard action to open up your nasal passageways; when bent across your nose they try to straighten. This “recoil” or “springboard” force gently pulls your nasal passageways open.

By positioning them just below the bone of your nose, the strips act on the narrowest part of your nose, the nasal valve. This bottleneck is most prone to blockage and sits one centimeter behind the nostril opening where nasal strips should be placed.

Why are they beneficial?

Nasal strips are non-complicated and easy to apply, as well as affordable and non-invasive. Because nasal strips are non-medicated, they are suitable for everyone whose snoring is caused by a blocked nose.

You can read more about nasal strips in our dedicated article and shop for SnoreLab’s recommended nasal strips.

What are they?

Internal nasal dilators, also called nasal cones, prongs and stents are small devices that fit inside your nostrils to keep them open and prevent snoring caused by a stuffy nose.

How do they work?

Internal nasal dilators reduce airflow resistance by propping open your nostrils. The springy material forces outwards when compressed to fit inside your nostrils, expanding the alar cartilage on your nose which is very prone to collapse.

Why are they beneficial?

Internal nasal dilators are quick and easy to use giving instantaneous benefit, they are also reusable and offer different sizes for optimum fit.

Which ones are best?

Because these devices go inside your nose, extra consideration needs to be given to the type you choose, so as to avoid negative reactions or discomfort. Look for types that use medical-grade silicone as they are anti-bacterial and easy to clean.

The important features to look for include:

  • Size – are there different sizes available to get the best fit?
  • Storage – do the dilators come with a case to keep them clean when not being used?
  • Shape – internal nasal dilators can be smooth, ribbed, winged or vented, the comfort of each being highly subjective. Some packs include a variety to help you try them all and decide for yourself.
  • Material – medical-grade silicone is ideal.
  • Lifespan – the great advantage of internal over external dilators is that they are reusable, make sure this isn’t a false economy by getting ones that last a reasonable length of time. Three months is a good benchmark.

What is it?

A neti pot is a small vessel used for practising nasal irrigation – the process of flushing your nasal passages with saline to clear a congested nose.

A must-have for anyone who is routinely congested and deals with snoring, neti pots are a great, natural way to clear your blocked nasal passages.

How does it work?

With a neti pot, you pour salt water into your nostrils to flush out what is blocking your nose, soothing the aggravated tissue.

“This neti pot is awesome. My wife snores like a saw mill. Her snoring has been reduced by 80%. I now sleep very well.”

Flushing your nasal passages with a neti pot removes allergens and irritants, clears excess mucus and alleviates your inflamed nose.

Who is it for?

We highly recommend them for:

  • People who suffer from dust or pollen allergies
  • Seasonal colds
  • Snorers who live in environments with poor air quality
  • People with chronic sinus issues

See SnoreLab’s recommended neti pot starter kit

A popular method for controlling snoring caused by a blocked nose is to use a nasal spray.

Which one is best?

Not all nasal sprays are the same so it’s important to match the type of spray to the cause of your nasal congestion.

  • Antihistamine sprays are good for allergy sufferers. They treat inflammation and a runny nose and should be used when symptoms worsen.
  • Steroidal sprays are suitable for a variety of conditions and are especially useful for those with long-lasting nasal inflammation.
  • Anticholinergic nasal sprays are suitable for snorers with a runny nose.
  • Decongestant nasal sprays constrict the blood vessels in the nose. They should only be used short term and are therefore suitable for snoring caused by the common cold.
  • Mast cell inhibitor sprays are good for allergy sufferers but unlike antihistamines can be used before the onset of symptoms as a preventative measure.
  • Saline nasal sprays are non-medicated. They use salt to break down excess mucus and soothe inflammation.

You can read a more in-depth description of each type in our dedicated article

What is it?

The Smart Nora system is a revolutionary, smart, non-invasive snoring solution unlike any other. It is an intelligent system that listens for snoring during the night and gently moves your head to stop it.

It is great for the snorer who has tried everything and could well be the last snoring aid you buy.

“Several times, my scores were off the charts compared to other users, but with Smart Nora, they dropped off incredibly.”

How does it work?

Smart Nora isn’t an anti-snoring pillow; instead it manipulates your normal pillow. Simply slot the inflatable expander under your pillow and fall asleep. When the detector unit hears snoring, it remotely activates the expander to inflate which gently moves your head to bring back muscular tone to your airways and stop snoring.

Smart Nora tackles snoring unlike any other snoring aid. Smart Nora gets to the root of snoring and addresses the common denominator: your relaxed airway.

Who is it for?

Because all snorers have a relaxed airway to some extent, Smart Nora is suitable for a range of snorers:

SnoreLab has teamed up with Smart Nora to get our users $20 off their purchase with the code NOSNORE20.

What are they?

Humidifiers are electronic devices that add cool or warm moisture to dry air.

Who are they for?

This can be a great additional snoring aid for snorers who:

Which one is best?

There are two main types of air purifier: cold mist and warm mist. Both types will suitably humidify the air in your room. At SnoreLab, we like the warm mist option because:

  • The heat kills potentially harmful bacteria that can build up in the unit.
  • The mist can be medicated with various aromatherapies.
  • Warm air simulates the properties of your nose.

Shop for SnoreLab’s recommended humidifier

What are they?

Air purifiers are electronic devices that use filtering or static charge to rid the air in a room of irritants, allergens and nasty chemicals.

How do they work?

Air purifiers can help snoring triggered by allergies and pollution. Irritants and allergens can inflame our upper airways which leads to stuffy noses and swollen throats, increasing resistance to the air we breathe.

Who are they for?

Air purifiers can be an ideal snoring solution for snorers who:

Which one is best?

When purchasing an air purifier, look out for the type of filter and what size particles it can eliminate. Also pay attention to how much noise the unit makes and if it can be easily moved around the house. We like the Levoit Compact HEPA air purifier because it is portable, quiet, safe and effective, with a shape that attracts air from all angles.

“My husband snores much, much less since we started using this purifier. Very high quality and effective!”

Read SnoreLab’s full guide to anti-snoring air purifiers

What is it?

Positional therapy is a general term for techniques used to improve your sleeping position to reduce snoring or sleep apnea.

How does it work?

Sleeping on your back makes you more likely to snore or experience sleep apnea.

Switching to sleeping on your side (laterally) is one of the most basic and effective ways to reduce snoring. This is because side sleeping reduces the compression of your airways.

Back-sleepers can try a variety of techniques to prompt themselves to sleep in healthier, quieter positions.

Such techniques range from using specific positional training devices to homemade hacks to keep you on your side:

  • Tennis ball therapy. This is an age-old tactic where the snorer has a tennis ball sewn to the back of their pyjamas to make back sleeping difficult.
  • Inflatable pillow props. We learnt this trick from a SnoreLab user. Stuff a fully inflated camping pillow into an empty pillowcase and lie on the empty tail of said pillowcase with your back resting against the inflated pillow.
  • Head elevation. Stubborn back sleepers can reduce their risk of snoring by sleeping in a more elevated position.
  • Specialist pillows.
  • Vibrating training devices. These detect when you are sleeping in a supine position (on your back) and vibrate to prompt you to roll over.

What is it?

Snooor is a small, battery-powered device the size of a watch face. It is a blend of wearable technology and positional therapy – the scientific term for making people sleep in healthier positions.

How does it work?

When you sleep on your back and your head is facing the ceiling for an extended period of time, the wearable will vibrate and prompt you to sleep on your side or tilt your head to stop snoring.

Sleeping on your back frequently aggravates snoring as downward pressure from your jaw and neck can restrict your airway.

Your mouth also has a tendency to fall open. This changes the shape of your upper airway.

All of these factors combine to compress the airway, disturb airflow and cause vibration – i.e. snoring. In the worst-case scenario, they cause complete blockage and sleep apnea.

Repositioning the body to open a snorer’s airway can reduce or eliminate snoring and has also been shown to decrease sleep apnea severity.

Why is it beneficial?

Snooor has some great features that could make it an ideal snoring remedy for many people:

  • Non-invasive. The optimal placement of the wearable is on your forehead but can also be worn on the breastbone.
  • Easy to use. When you sleep on your back and your head is facing the ceiling for an extended period of time, the wearable will vibrate and prompt you to sleep on your side or tilt your head sideways to stop snoring.
  • Lightweight and discrete. Weighs only 10 grams and measures 40x40mm
  • Affordable. A fraction of the price compared to prescription-only positional trainers.
  • Start seeing results in as little as a week

SnoreLab users can get 10% off Snooor using the code SNORELAB

There are many specialist pillows available that are designed to stop your snoring by changing your sleeping position.

Who are they for?

Pillows are suitable for anyone whose snoring is worsened by their sleeping position. A bad sleeping position massively increases your risk of snoring.

If you sleep on your back, gravity compresses your airway and sends your tongue and jaw backwards, all leading to a greater chance of obstruction and noise.

Though they are effective for many people, specialist pillows don’t work for everybody. If you have obstructive sleep apnea, pillows are only usually effective if you have the mild or moderate form.

Which one is best?

There are many different types of anti-snoring pillow. Which one is best depends on the causes of your snoring. The main types of pillow include:

  • Pillows to encourage side sleeping
  • Wedge pillows designed to give head elevation for back sleepers
  • CPAP mask pillows make wearing CPAP more comfortable and effective
  • Realignment pillows align your head and neck correctly to prevent airway compression
  • Smart pillows listen to snoring and proactively adapt to stop it.

Surgery can be a very effective solution for some snorers and sleep apnea sufferers. However, like all snoring remedies, it isn’t suitable for everybody.

For surgery to work, there needs to be a clear physical abnormality that can be corrected.

Surgery should be a last resort only when other techniques to manage your snoring or sleep apnea have failed.

Which type is best?

The types of surgery available are varied. What is most suitable for you depends on what is causing your snoring in the first place.

Surgery for snoring can be classified into three categories:

  • Soft tissue. The least invasive option, soft tissue surgery refers to a wide range of techniques that aim to trim or tighten the flappy tissue in your airway which is prone to vibration and causing obstruction.
  • Maxillofacial. A more drastic intervention, maxillofacial surgery involves changing the bone structure of your face, jaw and neck to create more space in the airway.
  • Neural stimulation. This type of surgery involves inserting electrodes to stimulate the tongue muscles to keep the airway unobstructed.

Read SnoreLab’s full guide to snoring and sleep apnea surgery

What is it?

CPAP stands for “continuous positive airway pressure”. A CPAP device uses a mask to force air into your nose or mouth to keep your airway open. It is very effective in treating sleep apnea, a condition where the airway repeatedly closes during sleep.

How does it work?

Contrary to popular belief, CPAP does not give you more oxygen, it simply establishes a current of normal air that props open your upper airway to prevent it from collapsing.

Normal breathing works via negative pressure, where expansion of the chest creates low pressure that then acts like a vacuum to suck in air. Conversely, by using CPAP, the constant flow of air creates high, positive pressure that forces outwards and pushes the airways open.

There are three main components to any CPAP machine:

  • Flow generator
  • Hose
  • Mask

The generator pushes air through the hose, to the mask and into your airways.

Which type is best?

Whilst the generator and tube are much the same (with some subtle variations and features unique to each product such as humidifiers), the mask is the part that varies the most. When being fitted for a CPAP device, it is important to consider the type of mask that is best for you.

SnoreLab has dedicated articles on the different types of CPAP mask and troubleshooting common CPAP issues

What are they?

Chin straps are another effective, if a little cumbersome, way to keep your mouth closed at night. They are usually worn under your chin and around the top of your head.

How do they work?

If you snore and frequently wake up with a dry mouth and sore throat, it’s likely that mouth breathing was the cause.

Plenty of snorers have weak jaw muscles or excess weight on their chins that pulls the mouth open whilst they sleep. This causes a troublesome switch to mouth breathing.

Studies have shown that your airway is narrower and more elongated when you breathe through your mouth, making vibrations more likely.

Who are they for?

If you can breathe clearly through your nose but aren’t taking advantage of it, a chin strap can be an ideal solution.

Read SnoreLab’s full article on open-mouthed snoring

SnoreLab’s Recommended Snoring Remedies

SnoreLab aims to give you the data to help you find the best solution for your snoring. Everyone is unique so there is no one-size-fits-all snoring remedy.

There are multiple techniques and consumer remedies that can be used to reduce snoring. Here is a guide to the popular solutions we list in SnoreLab …

What is it?

Mouthpieces are amongst the most popular and effective snoring remedies. They are usually made from medical-grade plastic and fit in your mouth while you sleep.

How does it work?

Mouthpieces, sometimes called MADs (mandibular advancement devices) bring the lower jaw forward to tighten the soft tissue in the airway that is prone to vibration. They also limit mouth breathing during sleep, promoting healthier, quieter nasal breathing.

Who is it for?

Around two-thirds of snorers can benefit from an anti-snoring mouthpiece and can even be a more effective treatment than CPAP for mild-moderate sleep apnea. They can be particularly helpful for:

  • People whose snoring has worsened with age
  • Overweight snorers
  • Back-sleepers
  • Mild-moderate obstructive sleep apnea sufferers
  • After drinking alcohol
  • Open-mouthed sleepers
  • Snorers with an overbite.

Which one is right for me?

There are many different types of MAD available so finding the right one can be a bit confusing.

When buying a generic mouthpiece online (i.e. not one custom-made by a dentist), we recommend adjustable mouthpieces or ones that come in different sizes; this will allow you to ease yourself into using the device and is less likely to cause discomfort.

Read SnoreLab’s full guide to anti-snoring mouthpieces

What is it?

Many snorers are tongue-base snorers. This is where the base of your tongue falls back into your airway and disrupts airflow.

Tongue retainers or tongue stabilising devices suck onto the end of your tongue to keep it from causing airway obstruction.

How does it work?

By squeezing the tip of the mouthpiece, you create a vacuum that pulls your tongue forward. The outer edges of the device rest in front of your teeth and gums, keeping everything in place. Once fitted correctly, your tongue will sit in between your teeth, crucially, away from the back of your throat.

Why is it good?

If you are indeed a tongue snorer, there are several advantages of a tongue retainer over a generic anti-snoring mouthpiece:

  • Universal fit. Tongue retainers don’t require and adjustment, you can wear it straight away.
  • Comfortable. The nature of a tongue retainer combined with soft, flexible materials mean no lower jaw pain and greater comfort.
  • Can be worn with dentures. Unlike mouthpieces, tongue retainers don’t fit over teeth so can be used by people with dentures.

Who is it for?

Many different types of snorer can benefit from the use of a tongue retainer:

  • Overweight people. Excess fat around the neck can lead to compression of the throat which can bring on snoring. Holding your tongue forward can mitigate this, opening your airways and reducing snoring.
  • Open-mouthed sleepers. If you wake up with a dry mouth or sore throat, it’s because you have been mouth-breathing in your sleep. This is known to aggravate snoring. Tongue retainers not only eep your tongue away from your airway but also promote quieter, healthier nasal breathing.
  • Mild-moderate sleep apnea sufferers. Tongue retainers have shown to be effective for people who suffer from mild-moderate sleep apnea and can therefore be an alternative remedy for those who don’t tolerate CPAP.

Discover SnoreLab’s recommended tongue retainer, the Good Morning Snore Solution

What is it?

Foam wedge pillows are specialist pillows that promote a raised sleeping position.

Who is it for?

Foam wedge pillows are ideal if your snoring is worse when you sleep on your back. They can also help with other conditions such as acid reflux (which is also implicated in some snoring cases).

How does it work?

Back sleepers are more at risk of snoring. This is due to the weight of the tissue around the airway acting to compress it and the increased likelihood of also sleeping with an open mouth.

Studies have found that even slightly elevating your head can have dramatic effects on both snoring and sleep apnea, with patients showing an average 32% reduction in their AHI score.

Raising your head slightly with a wedge pillow has shown to have dramatic benefits for many SnoreLab users.

“When I first started using SnoreLab, my Snore Score was anywhere between 50 and 96. I started to try some of the different remedies. So I bought a wedge pillow and in one night my Snore Score went down to near zero and has stayed near zero ever since using the pillow. I had seen three doctors, two specialists, one dentist and had a sleep study conducted – they all pointed me to dental appliances which I had trouble wearing. No one had suggested a wedge pillow. Thank you SnoreLab!”

Shop for SnoreLab’s recommended foam wedge pillow

What is it?

Mouth taping uses special adhesive to close your mouth at night and promote nasal breathing. It is best done with specialist, medical-grade hypoallergenic tape.

How does it work?

This simple, cheap and non-invasive remedy discourages noisy, unhealthy mouth breathing by gently holding your lips together, forcing you to breathe through your nose.

“They reduced my snoring significantly. My wife is very happy. On the first night I used them, she was worried that I was so quiet during the night!”

Breathing through your mouth is one of the most common causes of snoring; it compresses your throat, forces your tongue further back into your airway which reduces space and increases resistance.

Why is it beneficial?

As well showing great results for stopping snoring, encouraging nasal breathing with mouth tape also has other health benefits; giving you better sleep and reducing the chance of infection and allergies.

Read more about SnoreLab’s recommended mouth tape – SomniFix mouth strips

What are they?

Nasal strips look and behave like a plaster. They have a gentle adhesive that sticks to the outside of your nose just above the nostrils.

These simple devices open up your nasal passageways by sticking to the external surface of your nose (unlike internal nasal dilators which are inserted into the nostrils).

How do they work?

The parallel bands of rigid plastic use a springboard action to open up your nasal passageways; when bent across your nose they try to straighten. This “recoil” or “springboard” force gently pulls your nasal passageways open.

By positioning them just below the bone of your nose, the strips act on the narrowest part of your nose, the nasal valve. This bottleneck is most prone to blockage and sits one centimeter behind the nostril opening where nasal strips should be placed.

Why are they beneficial?

Nasal strips are non-complicated and easy to apply, as well as affordable and non-invasive. Because nasal strips are non-medicated, they are suitable for everyone whose snoring is caused by a blocked nose.

You can read more about nasal strips in our dedicated article and shop for SnoreLab’s recommended nasal strips.

What are they?

Internal nasal dilators, also called nasal cones, prongs and stents are small devices that fit inside your nostrils to keep them open and prevent snoring caused by a stuffy nose.

How do they work?

Internal nasal dilators reduce airflow resistance by propping open your nostrils. The springy material forces outwards when compressed to fit inside your nostrils, expanding the alar cartilage on your nose which is very prone to collapse.

Why are they beneficial?

Internal nasal dilators are quick and easy to use giving instantaneous benefit, they are also reusable and offer different sizes for optimum fit.

Which ones are best?

Because these devices go inside your nose, extra consideration needs to be given to the type you choose, so as to avoid negative reactions or discomfort. Look for types that use medical-grade silicone as they are anti-bacterial and easy to clean.

The important features to look for include:

  • Size – are there different sizes available to get the best fit?
  • Storage – do the dilators come with a case to keep them clean when not being used?
  • Shape – internal nasal dilators can be smooth, ribbed, winged or vented, the comfort of each being highly subjective. Some packs include a variety to help you try them all and decide for yourself.
  • Material – medical-grade silicone is ideal.
  • Lifespan – the great advantage of internal over external dilators is that they are reusable, make sure this isn’t a false economy by getting ones that last a reasonable length of time. Three months is a good benchmark.

What is it?

A neti pot is a small vessel used for practising nasal irrigation – the process of flushing your nasal passages with saline to clear a congested nose.

A must-have for anyone who is routinely congested and deals with snoring, neti pots are a great, natural way to clear your blocked nasal passages.

How does it work?

With a neti pot, you pour salt water into your nostrils to flush out what is blocking your nose, soothing the aggravated tissue.

“This neti pot is awesome. My wife snores like a saw mill. Her snoring has been reduced by 80%. I now sleep very well.”

Flushing your nasal passages with a neti pot removes allergens and irritants, clears excess mucus and alleviates your inflamed nose.

Who is it for?

We highly recommend them for:

  • People who suffer from dust or pollen allergies
  • Seasonal colds
  • Snorers who live in environments with poor air quality
  • People with chronic sinus issues

See SnoreLab’s recommended neti pot starter kit

A popular method for controlling snoring caused by a blocked nose is to use a nasal spray.

Which one is best?

Not all nasal sprays are the same so it’s important to match the type of spray to the cause of your nasal congestion.

  • Antihistamine sprays are good for allergy sufferers. They treat inflammation and a runny nose and should be used when symptoms worsen.
  • Steroidal sprays are suitable for a variety of conditions and are especially useful for those with long-lasting nasal inflammation.
  • Anticholinergic nasal sprays are suitable for snorers with a runny nose.
  • Decongestant nasal sprays constrict the blood vessels in the nose. They should only be used short term and are therefore suitable for snoring caused by the common cold.
  • Mast cell inhibitor sprays are good for allergy sufferers but unlike antihistamines can be used before the onset of symptoms as a preventative measure.
  • Saline nasal sprays are non-medicated. They use salt to break down excess mucus and soothe inflammation.

You can read a more in-depth description of each type in our dedicated article

What is it?

The Smart Nora system is a revolutionary, smart, non-invasive snoring solution unlike any other. It is an intelligent system that listens for snoring during the night and gently moves your head to stop it.

It is great for the snorer who has tried everything and could well be the last snoring aid you buy.

“Several times, my scores were off the charts compared to other users, but with Smart Nora, they dropped off incredibly.”

How does it work?

Smart Nora isn’t an anti-snoring pillow; instead it manipulates your normal pillow. Simply slot the inflatable expander under your pillow and fall asleep. When the detector unit hears snoring, it remotely activates the expander to inflate which gently moves your head to bring back muscular tone to your airways and stop snoring.

Smart Nora tackles snoring unlike any other snoring aid. Smart Nora gets to the root of snoring and addresses the common denominator: your relaxed airway.

Who is it for?

Because all snorers have a relaxed airway to some extent, Smart Nora is suitable for a range of snorers:

SnoreLab has teamed up with Smart Nora to get our users $20 off their purchase with the code NOSNORE20.

What are they?

Air purifiers are electronic devices that use filtering or static charge to rid the air in a room of irritants, allergens and nasty chemicals.

How do they work?

Air purifiers can help snoring triggered by allergies and pollution. Irritants and allergens can inflame our upper airways which leads to stuffy noses and swollen throats, increasing resistance to the air we breathe.

Who are they for?

Air purifiers can be an ideal snoring solution for snorers who:

Which one is best?

When purchasing an air purifier, look out for the type of filter and what size particles it can eliminate. Also pay attention to how much noise the unit makes and if it can be easily moved around the house. We like the Levoit Compact HEPA air purifier because it is portable, quiet, safe and effective, with a shape that attracts air from all angles.

“My husband snores much, much less since we started using this purifier. Very high quality and effective!”

Read SnoreLab’s full guide to anti-snoring air purifiers

What are they?

Humidifiers are electronic devices that add cool or warm moisture to dry air.

Who are they for?

This can be a great additional snoring aid for snorers who:

Which one is best?

There are two main types of air purifier: cold mist and warm mist. Both types will suitably humidify the air in your room. At SnoreLab, we like the warm mist option because:

  • The heat kills potentially harmful bacteria that can build up in the unit.
  • The mist can be medicated with various aromatherapies.
  • Warm air simulates the properties of your nose.

Shop for SnoreLab’s recommended humidifier

What is it?

Positional therapy is a general term for techniques used to improve your sleeping position to reduce snoring or sleep apnea.

How does it work?

Sleeping on your back makes you more likely to snore or experience sleep apnea.

Switching to sleeping on your side (laterally) is one of the most basic and effective ways to reduce snoring. This is because side sleeping reduces the compression of your airways.

Back-sleepers can try a variety of techniques to prompt themselves to sleep in healthier, quieter positions.

Such techniques range from using specific positional training devices to homemade hacks to keep you on your side:

  • Tennis ball therapy. This is an age-old tactic where the snorer has a tennis ball sewn to the back of their pyjamas to make back sleeping difficult.
  • Inflatable pillow props. We learnt this trick from a SnoreLab user. Stuff a fully inflated camping pillow into an empty pillowcase and lie on the empty tail of said pillowcase with your back resting against the inflated pillow.
  • Head elevation. Stubborn back sleepers can reduce their risk of snoring by sleeping in a more elevated position.
  • Specialist pillows.
  • Vibrating training devices. These detect when you are sleeping in a supine position (on your back) and vibrate to prompt you to roll over.

What is it?

Snooor is a small, battery-powered device the size of a watch face. It is a blend of wearable technology and positional therapy – the scientific term for making people sleep in healthier positions.

How does it work?

When you sleep on your back and your head is facing the ceiling for an extended period of time, the wearable will vibrate and prompt you to sleep on your side or tilt your head to stop snoring.

Sleeping on your back frequently aggravates snoring as downward pressure from your jaw and neck can restrict your airway.

Your mouth also has a tendency to fall open. This changes the shape of your upper airway.

All of these factors combine to compress the airway, disturb airflow and cause vibration – i.e. snoring. In the worst-case scenario, they cause complete blockage and sleep apnea.

Repositioning the body to open a snorer’s airway can reduce or eliminate snoring and has also been shown to decrease sleep apnea severity.

Why is it beneficial?

Snooor has some great features that could make it an ideal snoring remedy for many people:

  • Non-invasive. The optimal placement of the wearable is on your forehead but can also be worn on the breastbone.
  • Easy to use. When you sleep on your back and your head is facing the ceiling for an extended period of time, the wearable will vibrate and prompt you to sleep on your side or tilt your head sideways to stop snoring.
  • Lightweight and discrete. Weighs only 10 grams and measures 40x40mm
  • Affordable. A fraction of the price compared to prescription-only positional trainers.
  • Start seeing results in as little as a week

SnoreLab users can get 10% off using the code SNORELAB

There are many specialist pillows available that are designed to stop your snoring by changing your sleeping position.

Who are they for?

Pillows are suitable for anyone whose snoring is worsened by their sleeping position. A bad sleeping position massively increases your risk of snoring.

If you sleep on your back, gravity compresses your airway and sends your tongue and jaw backwards, all leading to a greater chance of obstruction and noise.

Though they are effective for many people, specialist pillows don’t work for everybody. If you have obstructive sleep apnea, pillows are only usually effective if you have the mild or moderate form.

Which one is best?

There are many different types of anti-snoring pillow. Which one is best depends on the causes of your snoring. The main types of pillow include:

  • Pillows to encourage side sleeping
  • Wedge pillows designed to give head elevation for back sleepers
  • CPAP mask pillows make wearing CPAP more comfortable and effective
  • Realignment pillows align your head and neck correctly to prevent airway compression
  • Smart pillows listen to snoring and proactively adapt to stop it.

Surgery can be a very effective solution for some snorers and sleep apnea sufferers. However, like all snoring remedies, it isn’t suitable for everybody.

For surgery to work, there needs to be a clear physical abnormality that can be corrected.

Surgery should be a last resort only when other techniques to manage your snoring or sleep apnea have failed.

Which type is best?

The types of surgery available are varied. What is most suitable for you depends on what is causing your snoring in the first place.

Surgery for snoring can be classified into three categories:

  • Soft tissue. The least invasive option, soft tissue surgery refers to a wide range of techniques that aim to trim or tighten the flappy tissue in your airway which is prone to vibration and causing obstruction.
  • Maxillofacial. A more drastic intervention, maxillofacial surgery involves changing the bone structure of your face, jaw and neck to create more space in the airway.
  • Neural stimulation. This type of surgery involves inserting electrodes to stimulate the tongue muscles to keep the airway unobstructed.

Read SnoreLab’s full guide to snoring and sleep apnea surgery

What is it?

CPAP stands for “continuous positive airway pressure”. A CPAP device uses a mask to force air into your nose or mouth to keep your airway open. It is very effective in treating sleep apnea, a condition where the airway repeatedly closes during sleep.

How does it work?

Contrary to popular belief, CPAP does not give you more oxygen, it simply establishes a current of normal air that props open your upper airway to prevent it from collapsing.

Normal breathing works via negative pressure, where expansion of the chest creates low pressure that then acts like a vacuum to suck in air. Conversely, by using CPAP, the constant flow of air creates high, positive pressure that forces outwards and pushes the airways open.

There are three main components to any CPAP machine:

  • Flow generator
  • Hose
  • Mask

The generator pushes air through the hose, to the mask and into your airways.

Which type is best?

Whilst the generator and tube are much the same (with some subtle variations and features unique to each product such as humidifiers), the mask is the part that varies the most. When being fitted for a CPAP device, it is important to consider the type of mask that is best for you.

SnoreLab has dedicated articles on the different types of CPAP mask and troubleshooting common CPAP issues

What are they?

Chin straps are another effective, if a little cumbersome, way to keep your mouth closed at night. They are usually worn under your chin and around the top of your head.

How do they work?

If you snore and frequently wake up with a dry mouth and sore throat, it’s likely that mouth breathing was the cause.

Plenty of snorers have weak jaw muscles or excess weight on their chins that pulls the mouth open whilst they sleep. This causes a troublesome switch to mouth breathing.

Studies have shown that your airway is narrower and more elongated when you breathe through your mouth, making vibrations more likely.

Who are they for?

If you can breathe clearly through your nose but aren’t taking advantage of it, a chin strap can be an ideal solution.

Read SnoreLab’s full article on open-mouthed snoring