Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treatment

Sleep Apnea, Solutions

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Treatment

If you’ve been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) or think you might have the condition, you may have questions about how to treat it.

There are several treatment options; the most effective way to treat your sleep apnea depends on the severity of your condition.

Generally, mild to moderate cases can be effectively managed with the same techniques used to treat primary snoring (i.e. non-apnea). Severe cases where your AHI is over 30 are best managed with CPAP.

In extreme cases where CPAP is not tolerated and there is a clear physical obstruction, surgery can also be an option.

This article explores the various methods that can be used to manage obstructive sleep apnea.

Each category has links to other useful SnoreLab articles on the subject.

Side note: what determines sleep apnea severity?

The severity of sleep apnea is split into mild, moderate and severe. These designations are based on how many times you experience apnea or hypopnea episodes per hour – your AHI score. This is where your breathing completely stops or partially stops for 10 seconds or more.

Make sure to read our article about sleep apnea diagnosis to understand sleep studies, the AHI score and classifying the severity of obstructive sleep apnea.

Making suitable lifestyle changes

If your sleep apnea is at the milder end of the spectrum, you can treat it by making some targeted lifestyle changes.

What is most effective depends greatly on what is responsible for your sleep apnea in the first place. Generally speaking, the following lifestyle changes have the most positive impact:

1. Lose weight

Your weight has a significant influence on your likelihood of developing obstructive sleep apnea. Simply put, the heavier you are, the more likely you are to suffer from OSA.

Side note: the statistics of weight loss and sleep apnea

Some epidemiological studies indicate that 70% of patients experiencing sleep apnea are obese, and 40% of obese people are suffering from sleep apnea [1].

Promisingly, research has demonstrated that losing 10-15% of your body weight can half the severity of your sleep apnea [2], and that losing 60% of body fat can eradicate sleep apnea for around 86% of obese people [3].

There’s no shortage of advice or special diets when it comes to losing weight. It can all be a bit confusing and overwhelming. No single technique works wonders for everyone, and drastic solutions are rarely stuck at for very long.

Instead, be sure to check out SnoreLab’s SMART strategy for effective, sustainable weight loss and also have a read of our full article of the impact of weight on snoring and sleep apnea.

2. Stop smoking and reduce alcohol consumption

Smokers, and even passive smokers are more at risk of snoring and experiencing sleep disordered breathing [4][5].

Some studies have found that smokers are 2.5 times more likely to suffer from obstructive sleep apnea [6].

Quitting smoking has shown to reduce your likelihood of experiencing sleep disordered breathing [7]. This is because smoking contributes to greater inflammation and irritation in the upper airway which predisposes it to vibration and collapse [8].

Further, a nightcap is also not ideal for healthy sleep. Alcohol causes your muscles to relax – even more than they do normally when you fall asleep. It therefore increases the collapsibility of your airway and heightens the risk of experiencing apneas.

SnoreLab users amongst many others have found that reducing their alcohol consumption yields drastic reductions in their snoring and sleep apnea.

3. Alter your sleeping position

More than half of all obstructive sleep apnea cases are referred to as “position-induced” sleep apnea [9], where the severity of the condition is made worse by back-sleeping.

By sleeping on your back, your mouth has a tendency to fall open. This changes the shape of your upper airway and makes obstruction more likely.

Sleep apnea can therefore be massively reduced by switching to side-sleeping. There are many techniques you can use to make this change – be sure to check out our guide to sleeping position and snoring.

Anti-snoring mouthpieces

Whilst not recommended for severe cases of OSA, a mandibular advancement device (MAD) can be a good option for those with mild to moderate OSA, or those who do not tolerate CPAP.

MADs brings your lower jaw (mandible) forward (or advance it) to tighten the tissues in your airway that are prone to slackening and causing obstruction.

There are many different types of MAD available so finding the right one can be a bit confusing. To get the best quality we recommend getting a mouthpiece custom fitted by a dentist, though this can be quite expensive.

You can still find great quality mouthpieces without paying loads for a custom-made one. Have a read of our guide to anti-snoring mouthpieces so you know what to look out for when buying generic devices online.

If your tongue causes obstruction in your airway, a different type of mouthpiece called a “tongue retainer” can also be effective for mild to moderate OSA.

CPAP

CPAP stands for continuous positive airway pressure and is a treatment suitable for moderate to severe sleep apnea sufferers. It is the primary method for managing OSA and has a wealth of evidence to support its efficacy.

In most countries, it is only available with a prescription after confirmed diagnosis of sleep apnea.

A CPAP device uses a mask to force air into your nose and throat to keep your airways open.
CPAP does not give you more oxygen. Instead, it introduces a current of normal air that creates positive pressure; this props open your airway to stop it from collapsing.

Many people are fearful of CPAP. Users can also struggle with their devices, experiencing discomfort, claustrophobia and air leakage.

Despite its scary reputation, it’s important to know that CPAP can be a life-saving tool. There are measures you can take to get the most out of it and cope with any difficulties you may have.

 

SnoreLab’s guide to dealing with CPAP issues

Check out

Performing mouth exercises

Research has shown that exercising the muscles in your airway can have a positive impact on mild to moderate sleep apnea.

These techniques are adapted from speech and language therapy and consist of repeated movements in the tongue, cheeks, jaw and soft palate in order to increase muscular tone.

Several studies demonstrate that patients with sleep apnea can reduce their AHI scores and sleepiness by performing these exercises regularly [10] [11] [12] [13].

You can read about all of the evidence and also learn the 5 exercises we recommend.

Surgery

Surgery is usually a last resort only when other techniques to manage your sleep apnea have failed.

Whilst there is some research to show that surgery can produce positive outcomes for OSA, there isn’t enough evidence for surgery to be routinely recommended ahead of alternatives like CPAP.

Usually, to be considered for surgery, there are several requirements that will be assessed by an ENT (ear, nose and throat) specialist first:

  • A diagnosis of severe obstructive sleep apnea, confirmed by a sleep study
  • A clear physical obstruction that can be rectified by surgery
  • Failed treatment with alternative methods such as CPAP and mouthpieces
  • Evidence that the condition is severely affecting your quality of life

There are many types of surgery for snoring and not all are recommended for OSA sufferers.

To get an overview of the surgical interventions available and the important considerations when exploring surgical options, be sure to read our article on surgery for snoring and sleep apnea.

Conclusion

Obstructive sleep apnea can be managed via a number of different means. What is most effective depends on the causes of your condition and its severity.

Regardless of which treatment route you take, many countries have support groups for people with OSA.

These organisations aim to educate and provide support with all facets of OSA.

They give helpful information on living with the condition, provide practical support with CPAP and other treatments, fund and publish the latest research into sleep apnea as well as organising support meetings in person.

Anti-Snoring Pillows

Solutions

Anti-Snoring Pillows

Can a pillow really stop your snoring? What types of anti-snoring pillow are available and which one is best for you?

Addressing the problems with your sleeping position is a great excuse to invest in a new pillow. There are many specialist pillows available that are designed to stop your snoring in different ways, so it’s best to do some research first.

First, ask yourself what you want the pillow to do. There are many different types with a variety of functions:

A bad sleeping position massively increases your risk of snoring. If you sleep on your back, gravity compresses your airway and sends your tongue and jaw backwards, all leading to a greater chance of obstruction and noise.

Though they are effective for many people, specialist pillows don’t work for everybody. If you have obstructive sleep apnea, pillows are only usually effective if you have the mild or moderate form.

1. Pillows to encourage side sleeping

Some pillows have ridges to encourage users to roll onto their side like the Posiform Anti-Snore pillow (pictured).

These have proven effective in clinical trials through reducing snoring and apnea events triggered by back-sleeping [1].

“[Using a head positioning pillow] both snoring severity and snoring index were found to be significantly improved in normal-weight patients.”

Many people unaccustomed to sleeping on their side find it uncomfortable. Some pillows address this and promote side sleeping with a triangular shape, or by allowing you to insert your arm into a hole built into it.

Not all pillows have to be for your head. Anti-snoring back pillows that behave like a backpack can also be very effective at preventing you from rolling onto your back.Sometimes, clever configuration of normal pillows can help you to sleep on your side. Read Michael’s story, a SnoreLab user who came up with a creative way of using a camping pillow to keep him sleeping on his side.

2. Wedge pillows


“Though experimenting with SnoreLab, I’ve found that by simply raising my head with a wedge pillow, I can cut my snoring by more than half!”
If you always revert to sleeping on your back, fear not. A foam wedge pillow allows you to sleep on your back whilst effectively reducing your snoring.

Wedge pillows prevent you from being entirely flat – the position where your airway is most prone to obstruction and snoring.

Studies have found that even slightly elevating your head can have dramatic effects on both snoring and sleep apnea, with patients showing an average 32% reduction in their AHI score [2].

Indeed, our own findings back this up. SnoreLab has found that the humble wedge pillow can yield dramatic reductions in Snore Score.

 

Read Fiona’s story, a SnoreLab user who dramatically improved her snoring after we recommended her a wedge pillow.

Many other users have also contacted us about their wedge pillows. We received this App Store review:

“When I first started using SnoreLab, my Snore Score was anywhere between 50 and 96. I started to try some of the different remedies. So I bought a wedge pillow and in one night my Snore Score went down to near zero and has stayed near zero ever since using the pillow. I had seen three doctors, two specialists, one dentist and had a sleep study conducted – they all pointed me to dental appliances which I had trouble wearing. No one had suggested a wedge pillow. Thank you SnoreLab!”

Side note: wedge pillows also help acid reflux

Reflux is where stomach acid comes back into your esophagus and throat causing irritation, disrupting sleep and sometimes influencing snoring in the case of “airway reflux”. If you suspect reflux has a part to play in your snoring, make sure you check out our four-hour-fast technique to your evening meal worsening youre snoring.

 

Shop for SnoreLab recommended

Memory Foam Wedge Pillows

3. CPAP mask pillows

CPAP pillows have cutaways in the sides allowing space for CPAP masks. These significantly improve the comfort of wearing a CPAP mask by lessening the pressure and misalignment that a standard pillow can cause.

Whilst these pillows don’t show a direct impact on apnea reduction [3], they can make wearing a CPAP mask much more comfortable.

The indirect benefits of this are massive; one of the main problems with CPAP is that people don’t stick to it. This bit of added comfort can make the difference between giving up or persisting.

 

Shop for SnoreLab recommended

CPAP pillows

4. Realignment pillows

“This pillow is amazing! Not only is it comfortable and helped my neck pain and headaches, but it has reduced the snoring too!”

Many people sleep with a pillow that puts their head either too high or too low which can cause plenty of niggling problems.

There are multiple pillows available that align the head and neck correctly to prevent airway compression. This “cervical positioning” technique can improve snoring as well as producing better sleep and reducing awakenings [4].

 

Shop for SnoreLab’s recommended

Cervical repositioning pillows

5. Smart pillows

 

“This product is amazing, it really works to cut snoring. Several times, my scores were off the charts compared to other users, but with Smart Nora, they dropped off incredibly!”

 

Smart pillows detect snoring and act to stop it. Some pillows vibrate, effectively becoming a snore alarm, whereas others move to stimulate your airways.

A revolutionary new system is the Smart Nora device.

This isn’t actually a pillow. Instead, it manipulates your current pillow. It consists of three main parts: an inflatable insert that fits underneath your ordinary pillow, a pump and a bedside unit (pebble) that listens for snoring.

When you snore, the pebble detects this sound and sends information to the insert which then inflates under your pillow. This gently moves your head, bringing back some muscular tone to your airways so they can open up, shutting down snoring. It does this all whilst keeping you and your partner undisturbed and sleeping peacefully.

 

Full review of Smart Nora

Read

Remember, you can save $20 with the code

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Conclusion

Bad breathing and the snoring it brings can be the result of bad sleeping positions. If you consider that snoring is a problem with your head and neck, it makes sense to address the thing your head and neck are resting on for one third of your life!

By using SnoreLab to gain insights into your snoring, you should have a good idea of what you want a pillow to do. Whether you want to turn onto your side, stay on your back, get better comfort from a CPAP mask or just sleep more comfortably, there are huge selection of pillows to choose from the could make a huge difference to your snoring.

Stop Snoring with these Hacks to Improve Your Sleeping Position

Diet & Lifestyle, Solutions

Homemade Hacks to Improve Your Sleeping Position

Many people snore because they sleep on their back. The good news is that simple causes have simple solutions: if you sleep on your back, it’s time to try sleeping on your side with the help of some simple techniques you can engineer at home.

Making this basic change – without the need for any invasive techniques, complicated devices or significant expenditure – can have a huge impact on your snoring or sleep apnea.

Why you need to sleep on your side

More than half of sleep apnea cases are referred to as “position-induced” where apnea is only experienced when the sufferer is on their back (supine) [1].

When you sleep on your back, your airway becomes compressed. The weight from your neck, a recessed jaw and your tongue falling backwards all lead to a greater chance of airway obstruction and the ensuing noise.

Tennis ball therapy

If you end up supine when you sleep, a tennis ball on your back can be used to condition you out of this habit. This rudimentary yet effective hack is so well known that it has infiltrated the snoring-science academic literature, even sporting its own abbreviation: TBT!

Tape or sew one to the back of your pajamas to make sleeping on your back difficult. What do we do when faced with difficulty and discomfort? We naturally avoid it. Now, crucially, sleeping on our side!

It doesn’t have to be a tennis ball. Any object small enough to fit, but large enough to be an obstruction will do the trick.

Some people even recommend putting a squeaky toy on their backs, adding some audible alarm to the physical discomfort!

There are also products available that use semi-rigid foam pads strapped to the back that effectively mimic the tennis ball. Unlike the tennis ball however, they also provide a degree of support because of their wider shape [2].

Remember, SnoreLab users can get 5% off at SomniShop with the code SNORELAB

 

You can replicate this effect by sleeping with a small, filled rucksack, a technique employed by soldiers in the American War of Independence to stop themselves snoring and giving away their position to their enemy.

Whilst these techniques work for some people, there are obvious downsides. Snoring solutions are only ever effective if they are actually being used, and many people give up with the tennis ball technique as it is just too uncomfortable [3].

Side note: further anti-snoring uses for a tennis ball

The humble tennis ball has many uses beyond training your sleeping position. Using it as a sporting object means you are getting some exercise, a great way to lose weight and keep fit which is one of the most effective ways of reducing snoring. You can also stick them in the tumble dryer to plump up down-filled pillows after washing – something else you should consider if your snoring is caused by pollen or dust allergies.

Make a side-sleeping nest

Try sleeping with your back propped against something to prevent you from rolling onto your back. If your bed is against a wall this can be ideal. If not, try propping yourself against some pillows. Experiment with different configurations, making a note of what works best for you.

Some people can find side sleeping a bit uncomfortable. In this case, it can be useful to place some pillows between your legs. This can help keep your legs and adjoining muscles at a more natural and comfortable angle, as well as preventing the bony parts of your knees knocking together.

A SnoreLab user contacted us with a very smart hack using an inflatable camping pillow:

  1. Get an inflatable pillow about half the size of a normal pillow.
  2. Inflate it to almost maximum pressure so that it is very firm.
  3. Put it inside an empty pillowcase.
  4. Sleep on the empty portion of the pillowcase to stop it moving away, with your back resting against the firm pillow.

Read Michael’s story, a SnoreLab user who trained himself to sleep on his side to combat his snoring.

“I use a small inflatable camping pillow, about half the size of my normal pillow. I blow it up to just short of its maximum so it is very firm and difficult to roll on to and push this inside a normal pillow case all the way to the end which leaves a tail. Sleeping on this tail stops the camping pillow from rolling away whilst propping me up and stopping me from rolling onto my side. If I want to get onto my back it’s quite a struggle and doesn’t happen by accident.”

If you simply can’t sleep on your side …

Our sleeping position is deeply ingrained. Making this change can be like changing the way you walk, or which hand you use to write. For some it’s simply not possible. If you are a committed back-sleeper, fear not, there are snoring solutions for you too.

Head elevation is the solution for back sleeping snorers. This prevents you from being entirely flat where you airway is most vulnerable to the effects of gravity.

Studies have seen that even slightly elevating your head can dramatically reduce both normal snoring and sleep apnea, with patients in these experiments showing a 32% reduction in their sleep apnea severity [4]!

“For as long as I can remember, I’ve always slept on my back, and as I got older this was making my snoring worse and worse. I have elevated my bed head by eight inches, a remedy originally to treat my acid reflux which has worked a treat for both that and my snoring.”

You can do this very effectively with a wedge pillow, the unsung hero of the anti-snoring world. You can create your own (maybe slightly less robust and comfortable) version with some clever pillow arrangements.

There are also ways to hack this with just a few books; stick a couple under the head end of your bed to subtly raise it. This little elevation can make a massive difference.

Conclusion

The influence of sleeping position on snoring and sleep apnea is huge. Understanding how you sleep and what effect this has on your snoring is vital information to help you identify your snoring triggers and solutions.

Sleeping position is a habit that is deeply ingrained, so can be hard to change. Keep track of what position you wake up in and what techniques seem to work. Positional therapy will require some time and trial and error, but persist!

Unlike a lot of other snoring solutions, these basic positional techniques are non-invasive. Crucially, they don’t require much investment of money or effort and can prove extremely beneficial if stuck to.

Finally, remember to select the “side sleeping” or “positional therapy” icons in the Remedies menu in SnoreLab to track how changing your sleeping position is influencing your snoring.

Sleeping Position and Snoring

Causes

Sleeping Position and Snoring

Sleeping on your back makes you more likely to snore or experience sleep apnea.

Side sleeping is the best sleep position for snoring. This is because side sleeping reduces the compression of your airways.

Back-sleepers can try a variety of techniques to prompt themselves to sleep in healthier, quieter positions …

How to improve your sleeping position

If you find yourself sleeping on your back and snoring, it’s time for some “positional therapy”. Simply put: try sleeping on your side!

Making this basic change, without the need for any invasive techniques, complicated devices or significant expenditure could have a huge impact on your snoring or sleep apnea.

Side note: a history of side-sleeping

It has long been known that side-sleeping prevents snoring. Soldiers in the American War of Independence and in the First World War were advised to wear their rucksacks filled with bulky things whilst they slept. This was to stop them rolling onto their backs and snoring, giving their position away to the enemy [1].

Your sleeping position is an ingrained habit, so can be hard to change. That said, there are techniques that can make a huge difference.

You can try to change your sleeping position with hacks you engineer at home, specially designed pillows or even vibrating training devices that tell your subconscious mind that it’s time to turn over.

1. Homemade hacks

Before you buy something to help you sleep on your side, give some of these free tactics a go:

  • Tennis ball therapy. Tape one or sew a pocket for one to the back of your pajamas to make sleeping on your back difficult.
  • Inflatable pillow prop. Stuff a fully inflated camping pillow into an empty pillowcase. Lie on the empty portion of the pillowcase with your back resting on the inflated pillow. We learnt this trick from SnoreLab user Michael

“I use a small inflatable camping pillow, about half the size of my normal pillow. I blow it up to just short of its maximum so it is very firm and difficult to roll on to and push this inside a normal pillow case all the way to the end which leaves a tail. Sleeping on this tail stops the camping pillow from rolling away whilst propping me up and stopping me from rolling onto my side. If I want to get onto my back it’s quite a struggle and doesn’t happen by accident.”

  • Bed head elevation. For stubborn back sleepers – slot some books underneath the head end of your bed to create the couple of degrees of elevation that could make a real difference.

 

SnoreLab’s full article on homemade hacks to improve your sleeping position

Read

2. Specially designed pillows

Some pillows are designed to keep you in more favourable positions to stop your snoring:

  • Wedge pillow. For the stubborn back sleeper who simply can’t sleep on their side; wedge pillows elevate your head which lessens the effect of weight on your airway. Check out SnoreLab’s recommended memory foam wedge pillow.
  • Neck realignment pillow. If you find side-sleeping uncomfortable on your neck and back, try one of these. SnoreLab’s approved pillow has adjustable height and aligns your airway to reduce the chance of snoring.
  • Pillows to promote side sleeping. Some pillows make it difficult to sleep on your back either with ergonomically designed ridges or with arm holes to stop you turning in your sleep.

“I was recommended a wedge pillow to elevate my head. I saw on the app that this could let me still sleep on my back but in a more elevated position so I was drawn to this idea. I found the position comfortable as I could go back to my preferred sleeping position. It’s also quite firm so my head was nicely elevated which gave me instant success.”Fiona, SnoreLab user.

 

SnoreLab’s full article on specialist anti-snoring pillows

Read

3. Vibrating training devices

These are devices that attach to your body and vibrate when they detect that you are sleeping on your back – the automated equivalent of a nudge in the ribs from your sleep-deprived bed partner.

The subtle vibration creates a subconscious prompt for you to roll onto your side. Evidence for their effectiveness is growing, with tests showing positive results for mild obstructive sleep apnea comparable to using a mouthpiece [2].

“The efficacy of sleep position training therapy was maintained over 12 months and was comparable to that of oral appliance therapy in patients with mild to moderate positional OSA.” [2]

The Snooor wearable trainer is a small and discreet device that sticks to your head or chest. We believe it has the potential to be one of the most effective snoring remedies available:

  • Non-invasive. Simply stick it to your forehead or breastbone. You’ll soon forget it’s there.
  • Easy to use. Simply press the button to turn on and then start feeling the vibrations after 20 minutes.
  • Lightweight and discrete. Measures only 40mm x 40mm.
  • Affordable. Unlike other positional trainers, the Snooor wearable doesn’t require a prescription and is far cheaper than alternatives.

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The science bit – why does sleeping on your back worsen snoring?

When you sleep on your back, your mouth has a tendency to fall open. This changes the shape of your upper airway.

The effect of gravity on your face, head and neck starts to compress your airway; this is particularly poignant if you are overweight due to the excess fat on the neck.

Researchers have measured these altered airway dimensions meticulously: using MRI, radiography and infra-red analysis of the upper airway [3][4]. They found that when you sleep on your back:

  • Your jaw recedes, compressing the upper airway
  • Your tongue falls back
  • There is more oval shape of the upper airway

All of these factors combine to compress the airway, disturb airflow and cause vibration – i.e. snoring. In the worst-case scenario, they cause complete blockage and sleep apnea.

Sleep-breathing problems are often related to an unhealthy sleeping position. More than half of all obstructive sleep apnea cases are referred to as “position-induced” sleep apnea [5], where the severity of the condition is massively reduced when switching to side-sleeping.

Conclusion

If you think your sleeping position is influencing your snoring, it may be time to consider positional therapy to start to sleeping in quieter, healthier positions.

Of course, there are many people who sleep on their side and still snore. Snoring has many causes so it’s important to explore them all.

Remember to check out our guide to specialist snoring pillows and clever hacks to help you sleep on your side.

Anti-Snoring Pillow Success – Fiona’s Story

User Stories

Anti-Snoring Pillow Success – Fiona’s Story

We like to hear from our users and find out how they use the app and what they have done to combat their snoring. With these user stories, we hope you can pick up some great tips and gain some motivation to address your snoring too. This user story comes from Fiona, who left a review on Google Play and answered our snoring questionnaire …

Scared to speak too soon but I think I’ve cured myself in five days flat with this app.

I’m fifty years old and in full health. I’d never snored until about two months ago when this snoring like a saw mill came on all of a sudden with no obvious explanation. I wasn’t sure what started it; whether it was age related, weight gain or breathing problems, I just didn’t know.

Sometimes, I did wake myself up with the noise, but I’ve been a good sleeper for as long as I can remember so was mostly oblivious to my new-found snoring ability. It was my partner who was suffering as even without the snoring, he’s already quite a light sleeper.

It got to the point where I had to try some remedies. I did an online search for some snoring remedies and found a few things I wanted to give a go.

Firstly, I tried some snoring rings that had acupressure dots on them; I bought one and then another to wear both together but they had no effect.

Then I tried Nytol throat spray which didn’t taste great. I also tried Vicks on my chest and some nasal strips; they did help me breathe a bit better but the snoring stubbornly stayed.

Nearing the end of his tether, my partner intervened and started taking away my pillows as he though I should sleep flatter. But this was just too uncomfortable for me. I normally sleep on my back with two pillows so to sleep flat felt awful. But at this point, I thought I’d try anything.

Even if he made me turn onto my side I would still snore, even with my mouth closed! I thought sleeping on my side with a closed mouth was meant to stop snoring!

That’s when I downloaded the SnoreLab app. I tried it for a couple of nights and could no longer argue that my snoring probably wasn’t that bad. I left a review on Google Play …

“Don’t like this app, because now I can’t deny to my partner that I do actually snore like a steam train! I can hear it for myself, OMG! Hopefully I can monitor this further and get some tips to decrease the problem”

SnoreLab replied to my review and offered a questionnaire they were making to help people identify their snoring triggers and things that might help.

The questionnaire made me aware of having one nostril always more blocked than the other, so I thought about seeing a doctor about potential nasal polyps and tried some steaming to clear my nose a bit more.

I was also recommended a wedge pillow to elevate my head. I saw on the app that this could let me still sleep on my back but in a more elevated position so I was drawn to this idea. I couldn’t find a wedge pillow in my local stores so bought a V pillow instead.

My partner and I had slept in separate beds for a week previous, so I decided to put this pillow to the test for the first time in a shared bed. He didn’t wake up once! Result! I found the position comfortable as I could go back to my preferred sleeping position. It’s also quite firm so my head was nicely elevated which given me instant success.

Thank you to the developers of SnoreLab. It has saved me from being bludgeoned by my partner! I’m continuing to monitor my snoring with the app as I don’t want to let things slip. For now, I’m sleeping so well and so is my partner.

Head elevation has shown to be a simple but very effective way of reducing snoring, particularly if you are a dedicated back sleeper. You can read more about sleeping position and its impact on snoring here, and check out SnoreLab’s recommended memory foam wedge pillow here.

All of our user stories are genuine accounts from SnoreLab users. If you’d like to share your experience about using SnoreLab, we’d love to hear from you. Please contact us on support@snorelab.com or get in touch on Facebook or Twitter.

In the interest of privacy for our users, names and pictures may be changed. We use the wording quoted to us by our users but may make small stylistic changes.

Stop Snoring with Side Sleeping – Michael’s Story

User Stories

Stop Snoring with Side Sleeping – Michael’s Story

We like to hear from our users and find out how they use the app and what they have done to combat their snoring. With these user stories, we hope you can pick up some great tips and gain some motivation to address your snoring too. This user story comes from Michael who contacted us on Facebook …

I started using SnoreLab in December 2016 because I didn’t believe I snored as badly as my wife suggested. I was wrong.

When I started using the app, over the first two months, my average Snore Score was about 50 with my peak scores around the 60 mark. I have been using it ever since, and the changes I have made now mean that my average is 26 with scores seldom over 40.

At 70 years old, I’m generally very fit and a very active cyclist. I’m interested in health matters so I can continue to be this way for many more years.

That being said, I suffered from acid reflux and have asthma. I’ve now got these and my snoring under control, with the remedies and techniques I use serving to help all of them together.

Using SnoreLab over the last two years, I have taken many small steps to arrive where I am now, making sure to monitor these steps on the app.

I apply all the usual sleep hygiene tactics to ensure I don’t go to bed exhausted and have as good a night’s sleep as possible.

I have elevated my bed head by eight inches, a remedy originally to treat my acid reflux which has worked a treat for both that and my snoring.

To help with my asthma, I also use Breathe Right nasal strips every night. Keeping my nose open has also helped to reduce my snoring.

For as long as I can remember, I’ve always slept on my back, and as I got older this was making my snoring worse and worse. I wasn’t fond of the tennis ball idea as I’ve heard that it can be extremely uncomfortable and can often wake you up throughout the night. After trying many other ways to convince myself to sleep on my side, only one thing worked …

I use a small inflatable camping pillow, about half the size of my normal pillow. I blow it up to just short of its maximum so it is very firm and difficult to roll on to and push this inside a normal pillow case all the way to the end which leaves a tail. Sleeping on this tail stops the camping pillow from rolling away whilst propping me up and stopping me from rolling onto my side. If I want to get onto my back it’s quite a struggle and doesn’t happen by accident.

This trick combined with the nasal strips and bed head elevation have really helped my snoring and I can hear the difference in SnoreLab.

 

All of our user stories are genuine accounts from SnoreLab users. If you’d like to share your experience about using SnoreLab, we’d love to hear from you. Please contact us on support@snorelab.com or get in touch on Facebook or Twitter.

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